Comment to 'Audiobook creation '
  • Unless you're an actor, you probably won't read as well as an actor would. Against that, you probably know how it sounds in your head, so you won't need the directing that an actor might. And there is the appeal to a listener of hearing the author herself. Plus, you'll save money. 

    I suggest reading a passage into your phone or laptop, and getting friends to listen, (or better still, enemies! - friends generally want to stay friends. Or pop an audio file on here, maybe.) What you're after at this stage is a view on your voice, expressiveness, diction etc. Find an actor acquantance and ask them to do the same piece, and compare.

    When I was thinking about podcasting, I looked into hiring a small local recording studio. One included a sound edit (getting out mistakes etc), and it wasn't prohibitive, but obviously wasn't free either. I found a couple of actors who have a soundproofed cupboard for voiceover work; and someone who has a working knowledge of Audicity, the free audio editing program. It's not impossible to set it up to do at home (see YouTube for how), but there is a learning curve, and it will take time, and the result won't be as good as getting experience on board. But maybe it doesn't have to be BBC quality...

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    • I just said I agreed entirely with Glyn, but - sorry, Glyn - I wonder whether actually it does have to be BBC quality. At least, it needs to be of a highly professional standard, same as the cover, same as the work itself.

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      • https://www.audacityteam.org/ (NB: With one slip of the mouse, I up-voted myself on the previous post. What a numpty. There doesn't seem to be a way of removing it.)

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        • That was what I was trying to say - it doesn't have to be BBC quality. It takes a finely tuned ear and the best playback system to spot the difference between good amateur/semipro and B B C.

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