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Hi,

I am part way through writing the second book in a series of children's story books in verse entitled Mickey the Scouse seagull. Whilst I have previously had my poetry published I am a complete new comer to the genre of writing for children.

I am currently looking for an agent or publisher to take my work forward but am still in the early stages of this process.

I have made a first attempt at an elevator pitch and would appreciate any feedback you could give me.


thanks in advance.


Mickey’s elevator pitch

A charming series of stories in verse with a distinctly Scouse accent, suitable for all children aged between 7 and 97.

Along the banks of the river Mersey in the great city of Liverpool lies the bustling port of Seaforth. A busy gateway to the rest of the big wide world way way over the horizon beyond the Mersey on far far away tides.

It’s also home to a unique feathered family of seagulls known as “the Seaforth flock” and one very special gull in particular Mickey the Scouse seagull. 

Introducing Mickey….

Our little friend Mickey was no more than an egg the day he arrived at the Seaforth dock. From the moment he hatched, amongst the empty container stacks he freely did roam, long before he ever learned to fly and make the skies over Liverpool his home. 

He is a graduate of the school of tough breaks and hard knocks but bears no trace of this as about his daily adventures he goes.

If you visit Liverpool and a seagull you should meet, be it on Bootle Strand or any other street; remember to say hello as Mickey it could be; oh and don’t forget to remember to offer him some cheese.


Copyright Peter Hill 2022 (All Rights Reserved).

Comments
    • How fun, Peter! What age group is Mickey aimed at? I can see this as a picture book. Mickey's 'problem' is that he's always hungry, and young kids can relate well to this. I can see him getting into trouble trying to find food and you have a lot of possibilities for humor too. It sounds like you've got a great premise!

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      • Hi Julie,

        Thank you.

        officially 7 to 10 years of age but it’s totally relatable to any age group up to 97. The humour is undoubtedly Scouse but seeing as Scouse humour is so well known and even in its subtleties widely understood, the stories should travel well too.

        The verse and the illustrations are meant to be easily imitated by the target age group. This in an educational setting is intended to be a useful tool for encouraging young children to explore language in an expressly different way to traditional story books.

        Best Regards 

        Peter 

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        • Hi Pete,

          The story sounds younger than 7 to 10 year-old readership to me. As Julie said, I can imagine this as a picture book or perhaps an early reader. Have a look at this site to see where your story fits: https://journeytokidlit.com/age-levels-for-childrens-books/

          Do you read any children's fiction in the age range you're aiming for? Definitely worth looking at other books for these readers to see what works commercially, what the genre expectations are, etc.

          Although we all want our books to appeal to anyone, any age, it's not a good idea to say this to an agent. They want to see that you understand the sector of the market you're writing for. They'll be impressed if you can show that you understand where your story fits.

          Sounds like a lovely premise! Good luck.

          Sarah

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          • Hi Sarah,

            Thank you.

            The actual dialogue and phraseology lend themselves to a slightly older age group than you might think. The 1st book has been appraised by seasoned educators of my target age group and the response was that it was ideal for helping the children they taught to appreciate and value reading and in particular reading books whilst pushing their vocabulary simultaneously.

            Because the stories are in a Scouse dialect the only suggestion that was made was adding a glossary to explain and contextualise the Scouse words and phrases used.

            The bit about children from 7 to 97 is a little tongue in cheek and I didn’t imagine anyone would take it literally though we all probably know some adults who never grew up.

            I will take a look at the link you shared.

            Really appreciate your feedback.

            Best Regards 

            Peter

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            • Hi Sarah,

              Having quickly read through the link looking at the word count of my book it is perhaps more an early readers piece. It would also be the type of story book that parents might read to their children too which along with the illustrations would make it appealing to a younger though less able reader.

              Thank you again. I will read the reference material further.

              Best Regards 

              Peter

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            • Glad it helped, Peter. A glossary sounds like a great idea too!

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              • It can't just rhyme; the meter has to be consistent. It's a must must must in childrens' books.

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