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How would you tackle this? All comments gratefully received.

I prefer to write in first person. However, my current novel has twin POV. The storyline demands that they will coalesce on two occasions, albeit temporarliy before separating once again. So, do I use first person for each, when the storylines are separate, deferring to the primary character when they coalesce (My preferred option) or, Keep the secondary character permanently in the third person?

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Replies (4)
    • I remember reading a book years ago, I think it was called Butterflies, where the first half was entirely in one pov, and then the second half (which slowly revealed the first speaker was lying throughout) in a second pov. Brilliant book !

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      • Thanks Georgina. The two POV in this case are a) a detective and b) the last of five murders victims who is made aware that he is a target. the chapters during the build-up alternate. I've just got to be careful.

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        • The problem reminds me a little of one of Agatha Christie's books, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. There, the narrator never lies but misleads throughout the book. Very cleverly done. The best lies are close to the truth. Don't know if that helps

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          • First POV rocks, and in the constellation you've mapped out it could add some spice to the story, especially if one - or both - of them arent reliable. Roger Ackroyd is a good example, Gone Girl also plays with that technique. 

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