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NOVEL SOFTWARE

I'm in the middle of a 3-day summit type thing, called STYLE AND VOICE. Some great tutorials so far... but I just watched one for new novel writing software, actually called NOVEL, which is either smart or confusing! Has anyone heard of this? You can see a walk-through here:

https://summit.styleandvoice.com/talks/novel-factory-30-walkthrough/?ah=efdd4b7221054a43a0270bd837fac42d

And they're offering a 30-day no-strings trial here https://www.novel-software.com

BTW, if you like what you see, they're also offering a 20% discount on an annual subscription, using the code SAV2022.... I'm in the middle of an edit right now, but might try out the 30 day free trial when I'm done... they have templates for various genres, you can insert pictures onto the Character cards... it looks very well thought out and easy to use. Has anyone here heard of it? Or used it?

There was comparison in the comments to Scrivner, saying S is basically an editor, while this program offers plot templates; character building; writing guides etc... I haven't checked out Scrivner yet either... Word is working for me at this point...

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Replies (17)
    • I've heard of the Novel Factory. I've just checked that they have their own YouTube. There are also YouTubes comparing different writing softwares. I have Scrivener & ProWritingAid premium. I like both of these and am tempted by some other software. Personally, I don't like buying software that I need to pay a subscription to instead of buying it outright. I don't know why but I worry about losing everything! It's just my preference. There is also Fictionary and Plottr which I've looked at. Scrivener is not an editor though as I consider ProWritingAid does that. On the other hand, I'm not a super user of Scrivener so there could be lots of potential that I've not figured out yet!


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      • I had the same concerns... I don't like my books being cloud based... I want them well backed up in my own hands! I think I'll try the 30 day trial though, to get some organizational ideas... they also have a lot of free things you can download to help you write, Character Questionnaire, Printable Work Sheets, Plot Templates for several genres, and blog articles on craft... so I'll be checking those out too. Always looking for new educational resources... and free is my preferred price, 😄 .

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      • Hi Jo, thanks for posting about Novel software, I've never heard of it but will have a look at it. I've used Scrivener for a long time and currently am using version 3 on a Mac. Like most things, you find things which work for you, and I have to say Scrivener is the best I've tried. Like Brigette I prefer buying something outright. I have M Word on this basis, though my version is quite old, it still works with the Mac operating system. 

        I find Scrivener does help all aspects of writing, planning, making notes, writing in scenes and then putting the whole draft together to make a book. I don't transfer to word until I have to as I hate it, too much scrolling to find things. As for saving work, I save every time I add anything new and email it to myself. I've learnt the hard way I'm afraid, and had to write the whole of my first book again.  I have done extensive editing in Scrivener but I guess you can do this on any programme, chaining font or colour of text.  

        As for paying for stuff, I am on a v tight budget, so usually do NaNoWriMo and get updates of software half price then. 

        The one piece of software I would love is a good proof editor. I have tried Pro Writing Aid, but it makes my prose too clunky and changes from English to US English, sadly this takes ages to change back again, but that is nit picking really. Sadly I think printing your book out and going down every line with a ruler is the only way to do it (certainly for me). But if anyone knows anything which would help that would be fab. 

        You can do character template, setting templates etc in Scrivener, and import files from practically anywhere for research or information. 

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        • Unfortunately the link I posted at the very top was a time limited one, and will no longer work... but you can still go to their site and do a test... I haven't had time to check it out yet (sigh), as I'm trying to get an edit done so I can send my novel to Beta readers, who are being incredibly patient waiting for me!  One day I hope to check out Scrivener as well, but for now, Word is working for me...

          Gotta say, I do love PROWIRITINGAID though... yes, sometimes I disagree (and have been known to report incorrect things, LOL), but I find STICKY WORDS, ECHOES and OVERUSED are my favorite editing aids... and I always end with GRAMMAR, as I'm terrible with commas!

          Whatever works!

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          • Hi Jo, I did have.a look at their website but unfortunately they don't do a Mac desktop version and there is no way I can write a book on my phone, so will have to wait until they manage to create a version I can use, but it does look good. Thanks for highlighting it to us.  

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            • I believe she did mention (in the talk I saw) that they're working on a MAC version... they also have a "dual author" version on the drawing board - but that's farther from release than the MAC version, LOL...

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              • Thanks Jo, I'm always up for new systems, at least ones I can understand, but I taught myself Scrivener so I will try it when it's available.  

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              • As one who uses Novel Factory, it's suitable for amateur writers. Most novel-writing apps, like Novel Factory, Dabble, Living Writer, etc... are designed to guide a new writer through the process, offering plot templates and easy organization of your characters and notes. However, now that I have experience, I could use Scrivener or even Word if I wanted to, as I don't need the training wheels anymore.

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                • Novel Factory might be fine for beginners, but I don't believe that you'll become a publishe author using it. 

                  I found this "The Writer's Idea Thesaurus" by Fred White. Lot's of good ideas in there if you need inspitation

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                  • At the end of the day you have to find what works for you. Personally, I’ve never used anything other than Microsoft Word to write and an Excel spreadsheet to plot. I tried Scrivener once for a couple of weeks but it didn’t work for me. 

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                    • I'm with L on this. Maybe a career in software has made me very cynical about technology, but I find that all these tools tend to nudge one in a certain direction, and I'm a contrarian by nature. I want a blank canvas to work on, especially at the beginning, and (this isn't intended to be one-upmanship, L) I sometimes begin with notepad - it doesn't get blank-er than that! Grammerly is great for suggestions, but you have to judge each one against your own goals and intentions, and the sci-fi AI that knows what you want to write before you write it doesn't exist, yet.

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                      • While I'm rambling, the other benefit of notepad is that it doesn't support italic, and considering the amount of emphasis and je ne sais quoi I find myself writing, that's probably a good discipline. 😀

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                      • Jo, I write in the free version of Prowritingaid which provides their full service but only in 500 word lots. As I write, the software makes suggestions, corrects grammar, and many other things such as passive voice, sticky sentences, adverbs, and stuff. At 500 words, I copy and past to Word and the writing is reedited with the free version of Grammarly. When that's done and a chapter is complete, I listen to it being read by the 'Speak' function in Word. On completion of the draft, I send it to another free service which isolates overused words and heaps of other stuff. It is the 'Speak' function in Word I find most valuable. If something doesn't sound right, it generally isn't and I make many edits as this proceeds. That's my basic process to get the draft in reasonable order and it costs no money.

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                        • I can't get past the monotonous voice. It would surely make prose far better than mine sound awful.

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                          • I LOVE PWA, but found the 500 word limit too restricting... I like to do a chapter at a time, which can be more than that (though sometimes less)... Fortunately, my DH gave me the lifetime full-service version for Christmas... so whoo hoo!

                            I haven't tried any of the 'speak' functions yet... I tend to like to write longhand and transcribe, so don't know if that would work for me... always something new to try! At the moment, WORD and PWA are my basics... the other was just something I came across with a tutorial... but I haven't had a chance to try it yet...

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                            • Yes, but it doesn't hurt to have the free version of Grammarly turned on when you are in Word. It picks up things also.

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