Sarah Juckes

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Hello!

My name is Sarah (Ann) Juckes. I work on the team at Jericho Writers as a Content Creator, which means you'll see emails in your inbox from me from time to time, as well as my face in various Feature films, Conversations and other films on Jericho Writers. I look after new exciting stuff for members too, so let me know if there's something you'd like to see in the membership, and I'll do my best to make it happen. 

I was writing for 12 years before I stumbled across Jericho Writers. They introduced me to an agent at their Getting Published day, and that agent ended up securing me a publishing deal for my debut novel 'Outside' with Penguin. What?!

I love writing for Young People, dark stories and quirky voices. I want to learn more about how to plot a book, because I do tend to make things difficult for myself. 

Looking forward to getting to know you!

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Self-publishing and want to give traditional publishing a whirl? Most agents are more than happy to …
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Are you making any of these most common mistakes in your query letter?  Dear Sirs [NEVER address an …
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Thanks to the tremendous success of the Summer Festival of Writing, we’re now able to invest in some…
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  •  · Fantasic idea. People throwing up sample chapters and asking for feedback (as I've done) is great bu…
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As brilliant as it is to win a writing competition, it can be pretty disheartening to find out your …
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  •  · Re Paul Bowers's bravely honest input. Maybe I'm an eternal optimist, but I wonder if the unforgivab…

Self-publishing and want to give traditional publishing a whirl? Most agents are more than happy to hear from indie authors. Although there are a couple of rules of thumb to keep in mind when you’re querying.  

  • Have you sold upwards of 10,000 copies of your self-published books? If so, this might be something an agent wants to know. Publishers seem to love picking up indie authors with books that come with a ready-made audience – just look at authors like E. L. James or Kerry Wilkinson.  

  • Are your sales less than 10,000? An agent needs to know if the title you are sending them is currently published and available elsewhere, but they don’t necessarily need to know your sales figures if they’re considered ‘low’. A short note in your cover letter saying ‘this book is currently available via KDP on Amazon and I retain all rights’ should tell them everything they need to know. If they’re interested in taking you on as a client, they will be able to advise on what to do with the title before sending to traditional publishers. 

  • Submitting a brand-new, unpublished book? If you’re not a big-selling indie author, there’s no need to mention your previous self-published work in your initial submission. Write your query letter in the same way you would usually.  


Are you a self-published author looking for a literary agent? Or perhaps you had a traditional deal and are now looking to make the switch to self-publishing? Share your stories below. 


What does a successful query letter look like? 


You only get one chance at a first impression. This newsletter spotlights practical tips, examples and templates you can use when writing your agent submission query letter.  



BURSARY: We’re giving away 10 annual memberships! 


To celebrate all the exciting new stuff going on at Jericho Writers, we’re giving 10 under-represented writers a free membership for a year. To enter, simply send an email to info@jerichowriters.com with the subject line ‘MEMBERSHIP BURSARY ENTRY’ by 24 September and tell us why you want to join Jericho Writers in 50 words. 


EMAIL YOUR ENTRY 


Spotlight 


SNAPSHOT: How to write an agent query letter (FREE for members) 


Learn exactly what an agent wants to see from a query letter by listening to an agent herself in this five-minute tip video from Laura Williams at Greene & Heaton. 


LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


BLOG: Advice on your query letter + a template 


Query letters don’t need to be fancy. This blog explains everything from tone to sign-off, with a handy template you can fill in with your own details.  


READ NOW 



WEBINAR: Slushpile LIVE with Sam Copeland (FREE for members) 


22 September 2020. Put your query letter to the test with one of the biggest agents in the UK.  Submit yours before the end of the day for the chance to have your work featured in this live webinar. 


LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


Join the community 


Get feedback on your work, share the challenges and joys of the writing journey and chat to like-minded authors on our friendly and free community. 


JOIN FOR FREE


How NOT to write a query letter 


Are you making any of these most common mistakes in your query letter?  


Dear Sirs [NEVER address an email this way, especially to a female agent.] 


Firstly, I wish to describe to you the way in which I was birthed. ‘Twas 1959... [Query letters should start with a short snappy sentence on your BOOK.]  


Please read the following 1500 word pitch... [Keep your pitch to two paragraphs!] 


This book is the next Harry Potter. [Don’t use big books like this as a comparison title – show you know the current market in your genre.] It will be loved by ages 1 – 100. [This may be true, but unfortunately that is not a market publishers can sell into.] 


I have never written anything before and probably don’t know what I am doing. [Even if you feel this is true, don’t say it in a query letter. Instead, talk about how you might have attended courses or are a member of Jericho Writers.]  


I don’t like any of the other books you have on your list, but you seem okay I guess. [You’ll be working with this agent for a while (hopefully!) Keep on their good side and don’t ever be rude.]  


Laters, [A bit of informal chat is nice in the latter half of your letter, but keep the overall tone professional.]  


Do you think this might be the worst query letter of all time? Think you have written worse? Join for free and share your query letter nightmares in the Townhouse here. 


Sarah J 


Plus, don’t miss: 


New Mentor added: Michael Braff (Discounts available for members) 

Say ‘hello’ to our new mentor, Michael Braff, who has worked as a fiction editor in the US with the likes of Penguin for dozens of years. Michael wants to see your sci-fi, fantasy and horror and can work alongside you as you write or edit your book.  


Agent Submission Pack Review (Discounts available for members) 

Our experts will review your query letter, synopsis and opening 10,000 words – perfect for anyone who needs actionable feedback on their agent pitch. 


New programme of events for members (FREE for members) 

Join authors such as Catherine Johnson, agents such as Sam Copeland and editors such as Debi Alper for five webinars every month between now and the end of the year, exclusively for members. 


 JOIN JERICHO WRITERS



Are you making any of these most common mistakes in your query letter?  


Dear Sirs [NEVER address an email this way, especially to a female agent.]


Firstly, I wish to describe to you the way in which I was birthed. ‘Twas 1959... [Query letters should start with a short snappy sentence on your BOOK.]  


Please read the following 1500 word pitch... [Keep your pitch to two paragraphs!]


This book is the next Harry Potter. [Don’t use big books like this as a comparison title – show you know the current market in your genre.] It will be loved by ages 1 – 100. [This may be true, but unfortunately that is not a market publishers can sell into.]


I have never written anything before and probably don’t know what I am doing. [Even if you feel this is true, don’t say it in a query letter. Instead, talk about how you might have attended courses or are a member of Jericho Writers.]


I don’t like any of the other books you have on your list, but you seem okay I guess. [You’ll be working with this agent for a while (hopefully!) Keep on their good side and don’t ever be rude.]  


Laters, [A bit of informal chat is nice in the latter half of your letter, but keep the overall tone professional.]  



Do you think this might be the worst query letter of all time? Think you have written worse? Share your query letter nightmares with us!


There’s never been a better time to join Jericho Writers. 

We’re so excited to announce a NEW programme of live events kicking off next week, exclusive for members of Jericho Writers. This is the start of a very special year for members, with more opportunities to pitch your work to agents; more courses from top tutors and more feedback than ever before – all included.  


If you’re thinking of joining – now is the time. Join for a month or save over the year, with no lock-ins or hidden small print. We genuinely want to help you write, edit and publish your book (like we’ve helped these brilliant writers over the last fifteen years!) 


JOIN JERICHO WRITERS 


WEBINARS: Announcing our NEW member events! (FREE for members) 


On the back of the success of our Summer Festival of Writing, a Jericho Membership now includes access to over five webinars a month, featuring top agents, editors and experts on writing and publishing.  


Kicking off with a special event with our team, your autumn/winter could now include special feedback events, live courses and one-off workshops.  


LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


What’s included in a Membership? 



WEBINAR: Slushpile LIVE with Sam Copeland (FREE for members) 


22 September 2020. Slushpile LIVE is back! We’re kicking off with one of the biggest agents in the UK, who will read members’ query letters and opening pages and give feedback live. Join now and submit yours before 15 September for the chance to have your work featured. 


LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK



FEEDBACK: Ask Jericho about your query letter (FREE for members) 


A hidden gem of the membership, submit your query letter to our team and we’ll give you feedback on it – all included when you become a member. 


LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


VIDEO COURSES: How to Write, Getting Published and Self-Publishing (FREE for members) 


These professional video courses offer you everything you need to know to start writing and publishing. Watch them at your leisure, as you need – they’re yours when you join. 


LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


ALSO: Members get access to... AgentMatch – our literary agent search engine. Masterclasses – filmed live at events. Features – with behind-the-scenes interviews with authors, agents and publishers. And Snapshots – quick five-minute tips. 



Exciting things are happening behind-the-scenes... 


Thanks to the tremendous success of the Summer Festival of Writing, we’re able to invest in some very exciting things – all soon to be free and forever available to our members.  


To kick things off, we’ve brought in Anna Burtt as our new Events Manager whose sole job is to bring experts to your door. She’s created a programme of 5+ live webinars every single month for the rest of the year, including old favourites and brand-new names. Going forward into 2021, Anna will be adding more and more live events to the membership, so you can connect with experts from all over the world. This all kicks off with a special ‘Ask Jericho Anything’ webinar on 14 September. 


One thing I’ve noticed when speaking to members is that not all of us learn the same way. A key thing I’m working on now is how to bring non-video content into the membership for next year, including transcripts for our key videos. I’m also looking to bring some new video courses to 2021 (perhaps with some exciting names attached – watch this space!). And – because we all love the chance to get feedback on our work – we’re looking into how to make this available exclusively to members, too. 


Change is coming and I couldn’t be more excited about it. Expect to see updates to the website as we introduce more stuff and make it super-easy to navigate. Until then – what do you want to see in the membership in the next year? How can we help you take your writing to the next level? Sign up for free to the Townhouse and share here. 


Sarah J x 


Plus, don’t miss the stuff members get discounts on:  


Manuscript Assessment  (Discounts available for members) 

Our most popular editorial service matches you to your dream editor and gives you tailored feedback on your work. It doesn’t get better than that. 


Complete Novel Mentoring (Discounts available for members) 

Write or edit your book alongside one of our expert mentors, including multi-bestselling authors and commissioning editors. 


Agent Submission Pack Review (Discounts available for members)

Our experts will review your query letter, synopsis and opening 10,000 words – perfect for anyone who needs actionable feedback on their agent pitch. 


JOIN JERICHO WRITERS 


Thanks to the tremendous success of the Summer Festival of Writing, we’re now able to invest in some very exciting stuff – all soon to be free and forever available to our members.  

We've created a programme of 5+ live webinars every single month for the rest of the year, including old favourites and brand-new names. We're looking at how to bring non-video content into the membership, including transcripts for our key videos. We're also looking to add some new video courses to 2021 (perhaps with some exciting names attached – watch this space!). And – because we all love the chance to get feedback on our work – we’re looking into how to make this available exclusively to members, too. 


Change is coming and we couldn’t be more excited about it. But first, we want to hear from you. 


What do you want to see from your membership in the next year? How can we help you take your writing to the next level? We'll do our best to make it happen!


What makes a prize-winning story? 


Entering writing competitions can be a brilliant way to build your writing CV and confidence as a writer, with the extra bonus of having the possibility of a prize at the end. But with writing being so subjective, what makes a story potentially prize-winning and how does the process of judging usually work? 


MEMBERSHIP: We’re cooking up something exciting... 


The Jericho team are working hard behind the scenes to bring some exciting new changes to the membership over the next year. If you’re thinking about joining, now might well be the time..! 


JOIN JERICHO WRITERS 


Spotlight 


FEATURE: How to win a writing competition (FREE) 

We interview the team behind the international Bath Novel Award to find out how writing competitions are judged and what it takes to win.  

LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


BLOG: KDP’s best kept secrets 

Our Publishing Manager Rachael Cooper reveals the tips she’s picked up from Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing whilst setting Jericho Writers up as a publisher. Interesting stuff! 

READ NOW 


SUMMER FESTIVAL: Congratulations to the Friday Night Live shortlist 2020! 

500 entries have been whittled down to just 6. Congratulations to Rachael Dunlop; Marian Smith; Carys Shannon; David Congreave; Tamara Henriques and Fiona Muxlow. We wish you the best of luck for the final live event on 4 September! 

GET YOUR TICKET 


Why the winners of writing competitions aren’t always the ‘best’ entries 

As brilliant as it is to win a writing competition, it can be pretty disheartening to find out your entry didn’t place. I’ve entered a LOT of writing competitions over the last decade. One or two I was lucky enough to place on. But most, I never heard anything from at all.  

It’s hard not to feel down when you don’t win. However, since I’ve been on the other side of judging competitions, I’ve learned something that’s made me feel much better about all those lost places:  

The ‘best’ entries aren’t always the ones that win.  

How come? Well, competitions can be judged by upwards of five people – all with their own subjective tastes. Each judge might have their own different winner. So how do you choose just one?  

More often than not, the winner of a writing competition is the one all judges can agree was pretty good. It might not be anyone’s number one choice. It might be number two for a couple of judges and a ‘maybe’ for others. The winner is the entry that everyone can decide on. The safe choice. The one that doesn’t divide people to love or hate it – just like it enough to agree on.  

If you didn’t win a competition recently, it could be that your entry divided opinion. And as writers who want to push boundaries and stir emotion, that’s not an outcome to feel down about.  

Have you ever won a writing competition? Do you have any of your own insights into the inner workings of writing awards? Do you wish writers would just get feedback on this stuff? Sign up for free and share in the Townhouse.  

Sarah J x 


Plus, don’t miss: 


Manuscript Assessment  (Discounts available for members)

Our most popular editorial service matches you to your dream editor and gives you tailored feedback on your work. It doesn’t get better than that. 


Complete Novel Mentoring (Discounts available for members)

Write or edit your book alongside one of our expert mentors, including multi-bestselling authors and commissioning editors. 


Agent Submission Pack Review (Discounts available for members)

Our experts will review your query letter, synopsis and opening 10,000 words – perfect for anyone who needs actionable feedback on their agent pitch.  


JOIN JERICHO WRITERS

As brilliant as it is to win a writing competition, it can be pretty disheartening to find out your entry didn’t place. I’ve entered a LOT of writing competitions over the last decade. One or two I was lucky enough to place on. But most, I never heard anything from at all.  

It’s hard not to feel down when you don’t win. However, since I’ve been on the other side of judging competitions, I’ve learned something that’s made me feel much better about all those lost places:  


The ‘best’ entries aren’t always the ones that win.  


How come? Well, competitions can be judged by upwards of five people – all with their own subjective tastes. Each judge might have their own different winner. So how do you choose just one?  


More often than not, the winner of a writing competition is the one all judges can agree was pretty good. It might not be anyone’s number one choice. It might be number two for a couple of judges and a ‘maybe’ for others. The winner is the entry that everyone can decide on. The safe choice. The one that doesn’t divide people to love or hate it – just like it enough to agree on.  


If you didn’t win a competition recently, it could be that your entry divided opinion. And as writers who want to push boundaries and stir emotion, that’s not an outcome to feel down about.  


Have you ever won a writing competition? Do you have any of your own insights into the inner workings of writing awards? Do you wish writers would just get feedback on this stuff?!


How to make your literary writing sing 


Good literary fiction is built on beautiful prose and unique style. This newsletter delves into what makes prose literary gold and how you can ensure your sentences sing.  


Ultimate Novel Writing Course – Deadline 28 August 

Write your novel in a year on this expert online course, featuring special events, mentoring, feedback from agents and more. We have just a few places remaining and the deadline for entry is this Friday! 

APPLY NOW 


NEW on Jericho Writers 


MASTERCLASS: Strong literary prose (FREE for members) 

Join indie publisher Sam Jordison as he unravels literary prose in this masterclass. He’s also joined by agent Imogen Pelham for a chat about the market for literary fiction as a whole. 

LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


BURSARY: Self-Edit Your Novel course 

Under-represented writers are invited to apply for a free place on September’s sold-out Self-Edit Your Novel tutored course, with one-in-four alumni now published. Closes 31 August, so get those entries in this week! 

ENTER NOW 


FESTIVAL: Get your latecomer ticket to see Neil Gaiman LIVE (Discounts available for members) 

We’ve slashed the price of the Summer Festival tickets for the end of August / September. Get yours now to join Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell live in conversation this week. 

GET YOUR TICKET 


The line between ‘beautiful’ and ‘overwritten’ prose 

I LOVE language. A beautiful sentence can evoke the same emotion in me as I imagine some people get watching sports, or sinking into a hot bath. But as a reader, I’m also picky.  

For me, less is more. I like short sentences with crystalised images. I like to see language pushed to its limits; adverbs massacred; and nouns exploding into verbs. I want every word to have its place and come together to create something delicious. 

But there’s a limit on how much of this I as a reader can take. If sentences are too long, it can feel to me like wading through a particularly boggy field. Words can quickly become claggy and I can find myself putting a book down.  

This isn’t to say every reader feels like this. If your style IS long, complex prose then I can guarantee that there are readers looking for that. But for new writers, my advice is to try not to worry about packing in too much. Cut back. Focus. Let your words have the space they need to do the talking. 

What do you think? Do you agree? Or would you take an ‘overwritten’ sentence every day over a short and snappy one? Sign up for free and let’s chat in the Townhouse.  

Sarah J x 


Plus, don’t miss: 


Manuscript Assessment  (Discounts available for members) 

Our most popular editorial service matches you to your dream editor and gives you tailored feedback on your work. It doesn’t get better than that. 


Complete Novel Mentoring (Discounts available for members) 

Write or edit your book alongside one of our expert mentors, including multi-bestselling authors and commissioning editors.  


Become a member of Jericho Writers


We’ve got a series of exciting opportunities and announcements exclusive for members of Jericho Writers, coming soon. Join now per month or per year and gain full access to courses, tools and masterclasses.  


JOIN JERICHO WRITERS

I LOVE language. A beautiful sentence can evoke the same emotion in me as I imagine some people get watching sports, or sinking into a hot bath. But as a reader, I’m also picky.  

For me, less is more. I like short sentences with crystalised images. I like to see language pushed to its limits; adverbs massacred; and nouns exploding into verbs. I want every word to have its place and come together to create something delicious.  

But there’s a limit on how much of this I as a reader can take. If sentences are too long, it can feel to me like wading through a particularly boggy field. Words can quickly become claggy and I can find myself putting a book down. 


This isn’t to say every reader feels like this. If your style IS long, complex prose then I can guarantee that there are readers looking for that. But for new writers, my advice is to try not to worry about packing in too much. Cut back. Focus. Let your words have the space they need to do the talking. 


What do you think? Do you agree? Or would you take an ‘overwritten’ sentence every day over a short and snappy one? 


How do you know when a book is ‘ready’ to be published? 


There comes a time when all writers need to down tools and declare a book ‘finished’ - whether it goes onto be published or not. There is particular pressure on this for indie authors, as that decision is often made by the writer, and will result in the final text being read by actual people. So, what can you do to finalise your text and make it ‘publishing ready’?  


WEBINAR: Use out of copyright works to inspire new ideas (FREE for members) 

19 August 2020. Join Melissa Addey for the final part of her ‘Getting New Ideas’ series, this time focusing on how you can take inspiration from old texts, to inspire something new.  

LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


Spotlight 


COURSE: Finalising your text (FREE for members) 

Taken from the Self-Publishing video course, this module looks at what you need to do to finalise your text before pressing the ‘publish’ button, covering editing, titling and branding.  

LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


BLOG: How to typeset your own book 

This guest blog shares tips on turning a Word manuscript into publishable book, including using Word-based tools and what to add before and after your main text.  

READ NOW 


MENTORING: Two new mentors have just been added 

Work on writing or editing your book alongside internationally bestselling thriller author, Holly Seddon, or renown ex-literary agent and current Commissioning Editor, Tom Witcomb.  

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MENTORING 


Your last-minute self-pub checklist 

So! You have a ‘finished’ book that you want to self-publish. Here is your quick checklist to ensure you’re ready to hit the ‘publish’ button.  

  • You’ve had a Structural Edit of the book. This means that someone (preferably a professional, but if not – someone with a very good eye for these things!) has given you feedback on character, plot, structure, theme – basically all the big stuff. You’ve made changes and are happy that the story is as good as it can be.  
  • You’ve had opinions from multiple ‘beta readers’ you trust. You don’t have to agree on all their points, but it’s good to know what kinds of comments you can expect from readers before they start leaving Amazon reviews.  
  • You’ve had the text proofread / copy-edited. Again, this can be by a professional, but more-often-than-not, this is just done by eagle-eyed friends.  
  • You’ve added preliminary pages / acknowledgments / a link to your mailing list at the end.  
  • You’ve had it converted into an eBook file and you are happy with the layout of all pages on an eReader.  

Remember, eBook files are easy to switch and change if you spot typos later on, so try not to feel the pressure for perfection too much. That being said, it’s worth taking the time now to ensure your book is at a high level before making it public. Have you got anything to add to this checklist? Sign up for free and share your thoughts in the Townhouse here.  

Sarah J x 


Plus, don’t miss: 


Summer Festival Latecomer tickets (Discounts available for members) 

Join 1,000 writers from all seven continents around the world for just a fraction of the price, with our discount latecomer tickets. August/September tickets now available.  


Self-Edit your novel bursary 

Under-represented writers are invited to apply for a free place on September’s Self-Edit Your Novel tutored course, with one-in-four alumni now published. Closes 31 August. 


Manuscript Assessment  (Discounts available for members)

Our most popular editorial service matches you to your dream editor and gives you tailored feedback on your work. It doesn’t get better than that. 


JOIN JERICHO WRITERS

Here is my quick checklist to ensure you’re ready to hit the ‘publish’ button.  


  • You’ve had a Structural Edit of the book. This means that someone (preferably a professional, but if not – someone with a very good eye for these things!) has given you feedback on character, plot, structure, theme – basically all the big stuff. You’ve made changes and are happy that the story is as good as it can be.  

  • You’ve had opinions from multiple ‘beta readers’ you trust. You don’t have to agree on all their points, but it’s good to know what kinds of comments you can expect from readers before they start leaving Amazon reviews.  

  • You’ve had the text proofread / copy-edited. Again, this can be by a professional, but more-often-than-not, this is just done by eagle-eyed friends.  

  • You’ve added preliminary pages / acknowledgments / a link to your mailing list at the end.  

  • You’ve had it converted into an eBook file and you are happy with the layout of all pages on an eReader.  


eBook files are easy to switch and change if you spot typos later on, so try not to feel the pressure for perfection too much. That being said, it’s worth taking the time now to ensure your book is at a high level before making it public. 


Have you got anything to add to this checklist? 


Writing books for a commercial market 


What does ‘commercial fiction’ mean and how can you ensure your novels appeal to the masses? This newsletter contains advice from top Commissioning Editors, so if you’re hoping to keep readers turning pages, read on... 


WEBINAR: Use out of copyright works to inspire new ideas (FREE for members) 

19 August 2020. Join Melissa Addey for the final part of her ‘Getting New Ideas’ series, this time focusing on how you can take inspiration from old texts, to inspire something new.  

LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


NEW on Jericho Writers 


MASTERCLASS: Writing great commercial fiction Darcy Nicholson (FREE for members) 

Editorial Director at Sphere (Little, Brown) Darcy Nicholson reveals how to make an idea capture the attention of agents, publishers and readers. 

LOGGED-IN MEMBER LINK

NON-MEMBER LINK


BLOG: How achieve your writing goals 

In this new blog, we set out the process of setting achievable goals for your writing, so you can ensure you keep pen to paper.  

READ NOW 


AGENTMATCH: Updated agent profiles (Exclusive for members) 

We’ve just added an interview with UK literary agent Clare Pearson to her AgentMatch profile and updated the genres listed on US agent Amanda Jain’s profile to include Arts, Narrative Non-Fiction, Science, Politics, society & current affairs, Other non-fiction, Food and Cookery, History, Mystery, Women's fiction, Science fiction, Historical fiction, Genre romance, Fantasy, Literary Fiction. Phew! 

SEARCH AGENTMATCH 


What does ‘commercial fiction’ mean? 

Confusingly as ever, you’ll often see ‘Commerical Fiction’ labeled as ‘book group fiction’ or ‘reading group fiction’. So what does all this mean?  

In a nutshell, ‘Commercial’ fiction refers to books that are written to entertain the masses – such as reading groups. It’s the opposite of ‘literary fiction’, where the focus is on beautiful writing and style. Commerical fiction is driven by story and memorable, engaging characters.  

Examples of Commerical Fiction are things like ‘Gone Girl’, by Gillian Flynn or ‘One Day’, by David Nicholls. They sometimes also fit into defined sub-genres such as romance, thrillers, horror etc.  

This is not to say that Commercial Fiction is any less ‘worthy’ than literary. Brilliant writing can equally mean beautiful language and a well-put-together plot. Literary fiction is often loved and revered by the few, whereas Commercial Fiction is consumed by the masses. Literary books are things and beauty, often in hardback – whereas Commerical books are often brought in paperback by the thousands.  

So – are you writing commercial fiction, or literary fiction? Does your book focus on language and style, or plot and character? Sign up for free and share your thoughts in the Townhouse here.  

Sarah J x 


Plus, don’t miss: 


Summer Festival Latecomer tickets (Discounts available for members) 

Join 1,000 writers from all seven continents around the world for just a fraction of the price, with our discount latecomer tickets now available.  


Self-Edit your novel bursary 

Under-represented writers are invited to apply for a free place on September’s Self-Edit Your Novel tutored course, with one-in-four alumni now published. Closes 31 August. 


Manuscript Assessment  (Discounts available for members) 

Our most popular editorial service matches you to your dream editor and gives you tailored feedback on your work. It doesn’t get better than that. 


 JOIN JERICHO WRITERS

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Sarah Juckes
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