Julie B

  • 598
Relationships
Empty
My Forums
  •  ·  47
  •  · 
I'm getting ready to enter a children's writing competition and they require a synopsis.😨 I've never…
  •  · 
  •  · 
  •  · Thanks for your advice, Doug. It really helps! Good call on those pesky little mistakes that got awa…
  •  ·  75
  •  · 
After a lot of thought, I'm changing the title of my children's chapter book (ages 6-9) but I can't …
  •  · 
  •  · 
  •  · Cackleberry  Quest has a nice ring to it but not sure if 6 year olds will understand the word? Perha…
  •  ·  129
  •  · 
Not my genre but I found it so interesting, I wanted to share. For all Fantasy, Science Fiction, and…
  •  · 
  •  · 
  •  · Thanks. That would be terrific.
  •  ·  109
  •  · 
I have a character arc that goes from being afraid to brave but this makes my MC too passive. To cor…
  •  · 
  •  · 
  •  · In that case I'm definitely selling it to you, or someone is.My given life is in three novels.  The …
  •  ·  88
  •  · 
I have to share this! I just watched a Tedx talk with Brian Weisfeld, author of The Startup Squad (m…
  •  ·  168
  •  · 
My MS has been stalled for quite a while now. I've tried putting it away for the summer, but now I'm…
  •  · 
  •  · 
  •  · Kate, I'm absolutely thrilled with your advice and suggestions. I'm going to start thinking like a c…
Julie B
 added a forum 

I'm getting ready to enter a children's writing competition and they require a synopsis.😨 I've never written one before so I'd appreciate advice. Does it make sense or is it confusing? There's no word limit as long as it fits on one page, single-spaced.

Seed [an orphan chicken] wants a family that is truly her own, not borrowed. [Her best friend] Gumball’s family has always welcomed her, but she can’t accept their help because she hates looking weak. Scrawny and small, she’s the lowliest chicken in the henhouse. But she’s determined to prove she’s more than the last hen in the pecking order.

Seed lives on a farm in Italy with the girl, Nicole. She learns from Nicole’s friend Luca that she has a relative, T-Rex, who sat on eggs. Gathering her courage, Seed tells the flock she wants to hatch chicks too. They laugh at her so she decides to run away. Gumball wants to go with her, but Seed abandons her friend and goes to the barn.

She makes her nest in the barn, but Nicole takes her back to the henhouse before she can finish laying all her eggs. Luca discovers Seed’s nest with the eggs and tells Nicole that Seed should stay in the barn. He understands Seed’s need for a family because he’d like to spend more time with his dad, who works a lot. Nicole cheers him up by suggesting they go hunting for dinosaur bones by the creek.

Meanwhile, Seed sits on her eggs and her loneliness grows. When one of her eggs rolls out of the nest, she panics. Lion [a miniature rabbit] helps recover it and she recognizes that by always refusing help she’s also pushed away her friends. Then a fox enters the barn. With the fox hot on her tail, she runs outside. She makes it back to the barn only to discover someone has stolen her eggs. Seed has no family, no friends, and no eggs.  

Seed knows she hasn’t been a good friend. She goes to the henhouse to win back Gumball’s friendship and together they find out from Lion that the kids have taken Seed’s eggs to somewhere called Incubator. They see the children carrying buckets and follow them to the creek, hoping to find the eggs. They don’t understand that the kids are digging for dinosaur bones, not burying Seed’s eggs. It rains and the children head home, leaving the animals free to search. Lion falls into the water and Seed drags him to safety. At the end of her strength and unable to move, she lies on a boulder, thinking. Families come in all shapes in sizes. Although she’s lost her chicks, she has a family in her friends.

The kids come to rescue Seed, and Luca notices the skeleton of a baby dinosaur fossil embedded in the boulder where Seed is lying. Finding the fossil might convince his dad to take time off work. When Nicole tells Luca that her parents are going to be proud of him, it dawns on him that he has not one, but two families.

The next day, Seed wakes up in her empty nest surrounded by her friends; her family. When the children arrive with her newly hatched chicks, Seed asks her friends to help her name them. Because asking for help doesn’t make her weak, just part of a family.

Back matter gives facts about chickens and the baby dinosaur fossil.

Julie B
 added a forum 

After a lot of thought, I'm changing the title of my children's chapter book (ages 6-9) but I can't decide on one!

Pitch: Desperate to have a family of her own, the orphan chicken Seed abandoned her best friend and ran away. Now her eggs are missing and she has no one. On a quest to find her eggs and win back her friend, she must first come to terms with the true meaning of family.

Which one do you like? Please vote for your first AND second choice:

The OrpHEN

The Cackleberry Adventure

The Cackleberry Quest

The Kidnapped Cackleberries

Julie B
 added a forum 

Not my genre but I found it so interesting, I wanted to share. For all Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Historical Fiction writers too. Particularly interesting the discussion on world-building and second and third-order consequences. Available for free for a short time only. 

https://writer-igniter-sff-summit.heysummit.com/talks/1-intro-speculative-fiction/

Julie B
 added a forum 

I have a character arc that goes from being afraid to brave but this makes my MC too passive. To correct the problem, I’m thinking of giving my MC an imaginary friend who manifests all of the MC’s fears. In theory, the MC creates an imaginary friend to reassure himself and show his imaginary friend how to be brave. Thoughts? Can anyone think of a children’s book with an imaginary friend so I can see how to approach writing this? 

My book is for ages 5-8 so I did a little research to see if this age group still has imaginary friends. I was surprised to find that school-age children are as likely to play with imaginary friends as preschoolers are, according to a study in the November issue of Developmental Psychology (Vol. 40, No. 6). It says imaginary others play an important role throughout people's lives--from childhood into adulthood. In fact, psychologists are now talking to fiction writers about their relationships with the characters in their books, which they believe may be analogous in some ways to children's relationships with imaginary friends. Agatha Christie famously said in her autobiography that she had imaginary friends as an adult. So…who thinks of their characters as imaginary friends?

Kate
 added a post  to  , Julie B

How are things going with Seed?

Julie B
 added a forum 

I have to share this! I just watched a Tedx talk with Brian Weisfeld, author of The Startup Squad (mid-grade series). He talks about his experience as a businessman to becoming a published author. Tedx talks are short, maybe 10min. Sorry, I don't know how to attach links, you'll have to google it.

Julie B
 added a post 

Eviction Notice:

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Fox,

You are hereby requested to vacate the premises. This is your last notice. Repeated requests to leave the livestock alone have left no impression. Your outstanding bill is of overwhelming proportions, as listed: 13 chickens, 1 rooster, 1 hen with 10 chicks, 8 miniature rabbits, and 2 geese. 

We have reached the point of exasperation and are pulling out the big guns. As of tomorrow, Axel Rose will be patrolling the property. 

Who’s that, you ask? He’s our new Maremmano Sheepdog, a breed born to guard and protect livestock. You say you’ve had a peek at him and can’t resist a chuckle? Well, he’s only 2 months and 10 kilos. He’ll soon be 50 kilos! You’d be wise to take immediate evasive action. :)

Julie B
 added a forum 

My MS has been stalled for quite a while now. I've tried putting it away for the summer, but now I'm dusting it off in the hopes that Townhouse can help me get going again. I know I need help with prose and any other suggestions or criticisms are welcome. 

It's a children's chapter book (5–8 years) and this is the second in a series of standalone stories, loosely based on real-life events. I'm posting the first 3,000 words.

Julie B
 added a forum 

Have you ever felt proud of something you wrote only to find out it was terrible? Rewriting the umpteenth draft of my children’s series has become an exercise in frustration. Gone are the days when writing was pure joy, back when I was happily oblivious to my blunders. 

Now I find myself in this in-between stage where I cringe as I write because, man, now I SEE what I’m doing, but it still keeps coming out wrong. 

Now as I write I’m continually saying, “Well this sucks” 

First drafts are supposed to be terrible, but the umpteenth shouldn’t. I really miss the days when writing was fun. 

Do you think that this is part of the learning process and one day writing will be fun again? Has this happened to any of you or is it just me?

Julie B
 changed a profile cover 
Julie B
 added a forum 

There doesn't seem to be a set rule and I'm a little confused. I'd like to know what others do. This is how I understand it. When writing in third person POV: Direct thoughts in first-person, present tense are italicized. Indirect thoughts in third-person, past tense are not. Correct?

Julie B
 added a post 

Avid reader. Sporadic writer. Wannabe author. 

I’m willing to be your beta reader in the hopes that you will be mine. I have a chapter book series for young children that isn’t ready yet. I’m stuck on revisions and stuck in the house on lockdown (I live in Italy). I’d love to read your ms and hopefully make future writing friends.   

Info
Full Name:
Julie B
Friends count:
Followers count:
Membership
Standard