Kate

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I came across this link on another writers' site, and found it a helpful reminder of what to look ou…
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  •  · I've not tried audio books, but it's interesting if the narrator is doing character voices, why they…
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Here's a link to an interesting 7 part Tweet by Literary agent Hannah Fergesen about critique partne…
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  •  · Workshopped can -- or does? -- refer to a formal process in which a group of writers discuss each ot…
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I read a useful bit of advice from one of my favourite writers, Bernard Cornwell.'If you're bored by…
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  •  · I re-wrote the first 10+ chapters in a whole new POV because it didn't work and had to scrap the rem…
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Details of some themed submission calls that might be of interest to short story writers and poets.h…
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If anyone would like to read one of my short stories, my HWA longlisted story is now available in Su…
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  •  · Thanks, Graham. Delighted you enjoyed it.
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Some journals which are open to short fiction submissions.https://www.authorspublish.com/35-journals…
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  •  · Brilliant, thanks Kate.

I've not tried audio books, but it's interesting if the narrator is doing character voices, why they don't prune some of the 'said's. It would seem odd to add in the monotone he said, after an obvious voice.

This sort of circles back to #18 and making sure the scene is working and doing what it needs to. In which case tagging quite possibly can be minimal.

I think she smiled/he grinned are easy action alternatives when you're trying to avoid too many she said/he said. My first drafts are certainly littered with them. But too many are going to stick out and make the writing feel like a beginners. Try coming up with an alternative action that fits with what is happening within the scene. A kid might bounce when they're excited, an adult might rub at the condensation on their wine glass when they're feeling down. Lots of possibilities. But don't tie yourself in knots trying to avoid them, or that might show through too.

Have you tried using the find function to hi-light all your smiles/shrugs. That way you can see on the page how many you've got and thin them out if they start to look like dandelions on a lawn. 

The Emotions Thesaurus gives lots of suggestions for tics. Worth a look if you've not come across it before.

There's an awful lot crammed into #18, Glyn. As you say, it doesn't have to be melodrama. I suppose the idea of the goal is to make sure the chapter has a narrative drive and the characters aren't just sitting around having a chat. Perhaps added to this section should be 'what is seeded for the next scene', to avoid the predictable rhythm you mention.

I'll be applying #30 to my sentences in future. A clever tip.

Added a forum 

I came across this link on another writers' site, and found it a helpful reminder of what to look out for as I dive into another round of edits. Hope others find it interesting too - 32 writing rules by Alan Guthrie. I particularly like number 20!

https://notetoselfhumanize.wordpress.com/2010/09/14/32-writing-rules-allan-guthrie/

Always a pleasure, Julie. It’s a lovely book and your poems turned out beautifully. Congratulations to Jon too - cheeky 🐿 

I've started a new project. Figured all those lock down books were just flooding the slush piles and I should move on.

I saw the same on Twitter for the agent who ghosted me!!! WHY?

Great news, Lynn. (And great advice). I've got everything crossed for you.

I had the same experience as Lynn. Hugely enthusiastic response from an agent. Then ghosted. It's very unfair and unprofessional, but what can you do. 

I guess it's another lesson in developing a thick skin and not pinning hope on full MS requests. And you're right. Perseverance is the key. Good luck.

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